The Birds of National Geographic Unique Lodges

From snowy owls to scarlet macaws, the number of bird species that you can spot at our lodges runs well over a thousand. Check out a tiny sampling of the creatures our guests have seen—in Peru, Alaska, South Africa and beyond.

The collared aracari is a smaller species of toucan native to Central America and northwestern South America. Spotted at Finca Rosa Blanca outside of San José, Costa Rica

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One of the most iconic species in the Galápagos, the blue-footed booby flaunts its azure appendages to attract a mate. Spotted at Finch Bay Galapagos Hotel on Isla Santa Cruz

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The lappet-faced vulture, also known as the Nubian vulture, is an endangered raptor with a wingspan of up to nine feet. Spotted at the Bushcamp Company in Zambia’s South Luangwa National Park

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The flame-faced tanager forages for fruit and insects in the forests of the Andes. Spotted at Mashpi Lodge in Ecuador’s Chocó rain forest

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Though it resembles a duck or goose while swimming, the common loon is more closely related to penguins and albatrosses. Spotted at Winterlake Lodge in Alaska’s backcountry

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Yellow-throated toucans, native to Central and South America, have few predators and spend a considerable amount of time preening their feathers. Spotted at Lapa Rios Lodge on Costa Rica’s Osa Peninsula

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African penguins, an endangered species found only on Africa’s southern coast, are also known as jackass penguins because their call sounds like a braying donkey. Spotted at Grootbos Private Nature Reserve in South Africa’s Western Cape

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Male and female scarlet macaws share the same dazzling coloring, and can often be seen flying in pairs over the rain forest canopy in Central and South America. They are monogamous and mate for life. Spotted at Inkaterra Hacienda Concepcion in Peru’s southern Amazon rain forest

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The snowy owl reigns the skies over the high Arctic, feeding on lemmings and sometimes even geese. Spotted at the lodges of Churchill Will near Canada’s Hudson Bay

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White-throated magpie jays live in tropical dry forests along the western coasts of Mexico and Central America. Males can make about 60 different sounds, which they often use to scare off predators and competitor species. Spotted at Jicaro Island Lodge on Lake Nicaragua

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The common nighthawk is a migratory bird found throughout most of the United States that flies south in large flocks to spend the winter in South America. Spotted at The Ranch at Rock Creek in western Montana

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Collared trogons lay two eggs at a time, often in in termite mounds or holes in tree trunks. Spotted at Masphi Lodge in Ecuador’s Chocó rain forest.

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The Seychelles magpie-robin was almost extinct 50 years ago, with only about 25 birds left, all on Fregate Island. Now they number nearly 200. Spotted at Fregate Island Private in the Seychelles.

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The intriguing shoebill stork grows to five feet and feeds on eels, fish, and even baby crocodiles, often decapitating their prey with their powerful beak. Spotted at the lodges of The Bushcamp Company in Zambia’s South Luangwa National Park.

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A great horned owl, native to North and parts of South America, has been known to squat in the old nests of other species, such as herons and eagles. Spotted at The Ranch at Rock Creek in western Montana.

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The Cape sugarbird is a long-tailed songbird that is endemic to South Africa’s Eastern and Western Cape regions. Spotted at Grootbos Private Nature Reserve on South Africa’s southern coast.

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The red-tailed hawk is the most common hawk species in North America. Spotted at The Ranch at Laguna Beach.

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Found in the wild from Mexico to Argentina, military macaws are popular in the pet trade, and have a “vulnerable” conservation status according to the IUCN. Spotted at Inkaterra Hacienda Concepción in the Peruvian Amazon.

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The little bee-eater has been known to dig a tunnel in the wall of an aardvark burrow and lay its eggs there. Spotted at the lodges of The Bushcamp Company in Zambia’s South Luangwa National Park.

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At home in the cloud forests of South America, the violet-tailed sylph is a hummingbird with a tail nearly double its body size. Spotted at Masphi Lodge in Ecuador’s Chocó rain forest.

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With a metallic green head and a curved beak, the orange-breasted sunbird feasts on the nectar of exotic fynbos flowers. Spotted at Grootbos Private Nature Reserve on South Africa’s southern coast.

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